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Thank you Diana ChangBlanc for sharing this with TechNet21 readers. Non-Financial Incentives for Voluntary Community Health Workers: A Qualitative Study A new report and accompanying policy brief (attached to this e-mail) present the findings of a qualitative JSI study that explored various approaches to sustaining volunteerism among community health workers in four regions of Ethiopia. Conducted as part of JSI Research & Training Institute's Last 10 Kilometers (L10K) project in Ethiopia, the study explored the potential of various non-financial incentives (NFI) used to engage and motivate volunteers. The results of the study outline the factors motivating volunteer community health workers (vCHWs), indicate other NFI mechanisms for consideration, and suggest programmatic recommendations. The L10K Project is a JSI-implemented effort to find long-term solutions to improve maternal, reproductive, newborn, and child health, and to reduce maternal and newborn mortality at the community level. Approximately 15 million people, or 20% of the total Ethiopian population, including 2.6 million children under five and 3.5 million women of reproductive age stand to benefit from the project's efforts to improve the nation's health system. L10K is working to extend the reach of the Ethiopian government's health extension program (HEP), which trains vCHWs to spread health messages and practices to families around the country. One of the objectives of the L10K project is to ensure the sustained engagement of these volunteers through NFIs. For more than a decade, JSI has been working in Ethiopia to improve people's health, including maternal, newborn and child health outcomes. The L10K project, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is so named because the average family in rural Ethiopia lives approximately 10 kilometers from a health facility. L10K is working to improve demand and quality of services in addition to closing that distance. The report can also be read and/or downloaded at: http://www.jsi.com/JSIInternet/Resource ... ancing.cfm ##text##
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Thanks for sharing the nice publication. Health Extension programmes are very important. I am really happy to see one thing which does not involve financial incentive that too coming from a country like Ethiopia. Usually most of the time you see that financial baits are given which is very wrong in a long run. Attitudes change. I think we have to think of similar programmes for our country also. Thank you once again. Regards, Nagaraj
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Thanks for sharing this Ethiopian study by JSI. Volunteerism is not just the name of a process it is actually a behaviour that comes with the package of humanity. In Pakistan we have an excellent model of non-Financial Incentives for Voluntary Community development through a WHO led program under the Federal Ministry of Health, called BDN(Basic development needs) program since the start of this century. It started in 7districts but is now extended to many others through support of GFATM,and just recently by GAVI-CSO grant. Community selects its CRs( community representatives), who in turn form VDCs(Village development committees) which then select their chairman and Finance secretary. All these posts are non paid, non political posts. The chirman is linked to the formal public service delivery systems through a governing committee headed by the Executive of the district at the top and the CRs at the local level with LHWs(lady health workers)A lot of projects related to health, education, small buisiness and micro credits are run by these voluntary committees. They are also running Community owned MCH centres. The government contributed initIally in the establishment cost.The CRs distributed Bed Nets, became TB-DOTs volunteers, are involved in health education/social mobalisation  etc. The chairmanVDC is called to many meetings for palnning and evaluation.He inturn calls his VDC meetings and discusses the issues with them. Some times the general body meetng is called in which all the CRs participate. All this gives them pride and happiness. Then is the strong motivational push that comes from our Islamic religious background. Helping others selflessly would be rewarded by God Almighty. Almost all the voluntary work that we see in Pakistan is based on this emotion. The BDN-model has been evaluated by third parties and found very successful. Details can be seen at the website of BDN-PHC-Pk
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